The Creator's Game: A Story of Baaga'adowe/Lacrosse by Art Coulson: The game of lacrosse is a gift from the Creator, given to the American Indians in the long ago. But Travis Skinaway doesn’t know the full story of the game: he only knows that he struggles to catch the ball and tends to throw it over the other boys’ heads. Maybe he’s not built right to run the field. His teammates and coach seem to think he’s hopeless, anyway.

Saints (Boxers & Saints #2) by Gene Luen Yang: China, 1898. An unwanted and unwelcome fourth daughter, Four-Girl isn't even given a proper name by her family when she's born. She finds friendship--and a name, Vibiana--in the most unlikely of places: Christianity.

Up in the Hawaiian Sky by Lavonne Leong, Illustrated by Jing Jing Tsong: What happens when the rising sun invites you to come along, too? Journey up, up, up into the Hawaiian sky with the sun as your guide, meeting birds and bees, flying over treetops and airplanes, and soaring through an outstretched rainbow. Then set softly down on the sandy shore as the sun's busy day comes to an end.

Little You by Richard Van Camp, illustrated by Julie Flett: Richard Van Camp, internationally renowned storyteller and bestselling author Van Camp, has partnered with talented illustrator Julie Flett to create a tender board book for babies and toddlers that honors the child in everyone. With its delightful contemporary illustrations, Little You is perfect to be shared, read or sung to all the little people in your life--and the new little ones on the way!

A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin by Jennifer Fisher Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet: Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet team up once again to share this inspiring story of a self-taught painter from humble beginnings who despite many obstacles, was ultimately able to do what he loved, and be recognized for who he was: an artist.

Africa is My Home: A Child of the Amistad by Monica Edinger: Narrated in a remarkable first-person voice, this fictionalized book of memories of a real-life figure retells history through the eyes of a child — from seeing mirrors for the first time and struggling with laughably complicated clothing to longing for family and a home she never forgets.

P.S. Be Eleven by Rita Williams-Garcia: In this exquisite sequel to the New York Times bestseller One Crazy Summer, the Gaither sisters return to Brooklyn and find that changes large and small have come to their home.

Marisol McDonald and the Clash Bash: Marisol McDonald y La Fiesta Sin Igual by Monica Brown: In this delightful story told in English and Spanish, author Monica Brown and illustrator Sara Palacios once again bring the irrepressible Marisol McDonald to life. With her bright red hair, golden brown skin, mismatched outfits, and endearing individuality, this free-spirited Peruvian-Scottish-American girl is headed straight into the hearts of young readers everywhere.

Darius & Twig by Walter Dean Myers: Darius and Twig are an unlikely pair: Darius is a writer whose only escape is his alter ego, a peregrine falcon named Fury, and Twig is a middle-distance runner striving for athletic success. But they are drawn together in the struggle to overcome the obstacles that life in Harlem throws at them. The two friends must face down bullies, an abusive uncle, and the idea that they'll be stuck in the same place forever.

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth: Lewis "Shoe" Blake is used to the joys and difficulties of life on the Tuscarora Indian reservation in 1975: the joking, the Fireball games, the snow blowing through his roof. What he's not used to is white people being nice to him -- people like George Haddonfield, whose family recently moved to town with the Air Force.

Boxers (Boxers & Saints #1) by Gene Luen Yang: China, 1898. Bands of foreign missionaries and soldiers roam the countryside, bullying and robbing Chinese peasants. Harnessing the powers of ancient Chinese gods, Little Bao recruits an army of Boxers--commoners trained in kung fu--who fight to free China from "foreign devils." Against all odds, this grass-roots rebellion is violently successful. But nothing is simple. Little Bao is fighting for the glory of China, but at what cost?

Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan: In the tradition of Out of My Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird, this is an intensely moving middle grade novel about being an outsider, coping with loss, and discovering the true meaning of family.

Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, American's First Black Paratroopers by Tanya Lee Stone.

How I Became a Ghost by Tim Tingle: Told in the words of Isaac, a Choctaw boy who does not survive the Trail of Tears, HOW I BECAME A GHOST is a tale of innocence and resilience in the face of tragedy.

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell: Set over the course of one school year, this is the story of two star-crossed sixteen-year-olds—smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

Diego Rivera: An Artist for the People by Susan Goldman Rubin: offers young readers unique insight into the life and artwork of the famous Mexican painter and muralist.

The Lightning Dreamer: Cuba's Greatest Abolitionist by Margarita Engle: In passionate, accessible verses of her own, Engle evokes the voice of this book-loving feminist and abolitionist who bravely resisted an arranged marriage at the age of fourteen, and was ultimately courageous enough to fight against injustice. Historical notes, excerpts, and source notes round out this exceptional tribute.

Knock Knock: My Dad's Dream for Me by Daniel Beaty, illustrated by Bryan Collier: But what happens when, one day, that "knock knock" doesn't come? This powerful and inspiring book shows the love that an absent parent can leave behind, and the strength that children find in themselves as they grow up and follow their dreams.

Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac: As the legendary Killer of Enemies was in the ancient days of the Apache people, Lozen is meant to be a more than a hunter. Lozen is meant to be a hero.

Kenta and the Big Wave by Ruth Ohi: In this evocative picture book, Ruth Ohi's glowing art transports the reader to Japan with gentle images that offer reassurance amidst the background of an environmental catastrophe. Inspired by true stories of personal items being washed ashore thousands of miles away after the tsunami of 2011, "Kenta and The Big Wave" is about the strength of the human spirit and the power of Mother Nature. An afterword explains tsunamis to young readers.

Nelson Mandela by Kadir Nelson: Kadir Nelson tells the story of Mandela, a global icon, in poignant verse and glorious illustrations. It is the story of a young boy's determination to change South Africa and of the struggles of a man who eventually became the president of his country by believing in equality for people of all colors. Readers will be inspired by Mandela's triumph and his lifelong quest to create a more just world.

 

Martin & Mahalia: His Words, Her Song by Andrea Davis Pinkney: Told through Andrea Davis Pinkney's poetic prose and Brian Pinkney's evocative illustration, the stories of these two powerful voices and lives are told side-by-side -- as they would one day walk -- following the journey from their youth to a culmination at this historical event when they united as one and inspiring kids to find their own voices and speak up for what is right.

 

 

March: Book One by John Robert Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell (Artist): Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1950s comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

Looks Like Daylight: Voices of Indigenous Kids by Deborah Ellis: Ellis briefly introduces each child and then steps back, letting the kids speak directly to the reader, talking about their daily lives, about the things that interest them, and about how being Native has affected who they are and how they see the world.

 

 

This is the Rope: A Story From the Great Migration by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by James Ransome: During the time of the Great Migration, millions of African American families relocated from the South, seeking better opportunities. With grace and poignancy, Woodson’s lilting storytelling and Ransome’s masterful oil paintings of country and city life tell a rich story of a family adapting to change as they hold on to the past and embrace the future.

Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote by Duncan Tonatiuh: In this allegorical picture book, a young rabbit named Pancho eagerly awaits his papa’s return...Duncan Tonatiuh brings to light the hardship and struggles faced by thousands of families who seek to make better lives for themselves and their children by illegally crossing the border.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico by Susan L. Roth, Cindy Trumbore: With striking collage illustrations, a unique format, and engaging storytelling, PARROTS OVER PUERTO RICO invites readers to witness the amazing recovery efforts that have enabled Puerto Rican parrots to fly over their island once again.

 

Nino Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales: No opponent is too big a challenge for the cunning skills of Niño—popsicle eater, toy lover, somersault expert, and world champion lucha libre competitor!

 

 

Wild Berries/Pikaci-Minisa by Julie Flett: Spend the day picking wild blueberries with Clarence and his grandmother. Meet ant, spider, and fox in a beautiful woodland landscape, the ancestral home of author and illustrator Julie Flett. This book is written in both English and Cree, in particular the n-dialect, also known as Swampy Cree from the Cumberland House area.

The Tortoise & the Hare by Jerry Pinkney: This companion to the Caldecott Medal-winning the Lion & the Mouse tells the tale of how Even the slowest tortoise can defeat the quickest hare, and even the proudest hare can learn a timeless lesson from the most humble tortoise.

The Thing About Luck by Cynthia Kadohata: There is bad luck, good luck, and making your own luck—which is exactly what Summer must do to save her family.

Tito Puente, Mambo King by Monica Brown, illustrations by Rafael Lopez: Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, clap your hands for Tito Puente... The Mambo King plays and sways ans people dance the mambo, the rumba, and the cha-cha!

When I Was Eight by Christy Jordan-Fention, Margaret Pokiak-Fention, & Gabrielle Grimard: Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by stunning illustrations, "When I Was Eight" makes the bestselling "Fatty Legs" accessible to young children. Now they, too, can meet this remarkable girl who reminds us what power we hold when we can read.

Yes! We Are Latinos! by Alma Flor Ada: Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States.